Posts Tagged 'green'

Pants Thrift

After some quality time at the Salvation Army on Little River Monday, I finally have pants.  It is a glorious feeling.

new pants

I also found a sweater that is covered with alpaca, and also probably made from alpaca.

alpaca sweater

I will wear it and dream of the day I have my own alpaca farm.

I also found: some stripy shirts appropriate for impending spring; a green fleece for me with elastic cuffs to keep me warm on the bike; a thin black fleece for V (he’s really into layering); an orange sweater that I might wear, or maybe it will fit V, or I will make it into something else; a couple of skirts; and a large green thing that might be a dress.  Not pictured are a necklace for me and one for a friend.  Big album of all this is here.

purple and green skirtsgreen dressstripy shirtsorange sweaterblack and green fleece

Window Shopping

My laptop has been sitting around, naked and unprotected from the dangers of her surroundings.  Alone most of the day, completely exposed to the ravages of…well, wayward photons.  I guess.   You see, I’m trying to rationalize my desire to buy an awesome laptop case.  I do need one.  One day, I’d like to be able to leave the house with her.

I’m hoping that my need to protect my investment justifies the amount of time I spent looking for laptop cases today.  Recycled material, fair trade, sustainable fibers, and proper laptop padding are apparently all quite compatible.  I have at least four favorites.  There’s a vertical bag made from recycled mosquito netting at Peaceful Valley, in green and red.  It’s big enough for a 15.4 laptop, but it doesn’t say how the laptop pocket is padded.  But hey, if it’s not padded, maybe I could put it in this slim red leather case with fake purple fur lining from bronwenhandcrafted, at etsy.  Man, with that wrapping, I could stick her in anything and she’d be safe! Or at least fabulous.

But if it’s not a red leather and purple fur day, I could use this inexpensive, recycled plastic bag from Verdant Computing.  It comes in black, sky blue and orangish, and it looks way useful and unassuming.  Like, if useful and unassuming is your thing.  And one I keep going back to is this reclaimed plastic case that’s made from fused waste materials in India, and fairly traded.  The company that makes them, Conserve, has some really gorgeous bags, but the laptop cases come in less exciting color combinations right now.

As much as I liked them all, I don’t like any of them enough to commit right now.  And I’m hoping that, after this weekend, it won’t matter.  I have the sewing machine all set up, and some extra strong canvas and soft fleece, so I could make my own, and that’d be pretty awesome!  Or I could knit a case for it with some of my yarn stash.  Or maybe I should stop looking through etsy and getting ideas about what can be done with my extra fabric and yarn.  But I’m envisioning a canvas case with two shoulder straps and a carrying handle, a medium-sized top flap, an internal divider…

I need a case for real though, so if inspiration hasn’t made my hands swift and seams tight this weekend, I need to buckle down and pick something.  I’m leaning to the mosquito net thing right now.

Hippie Hamlet sums it up:  To buy, or DIY?

Recycling CFLs

Seeing how I’m concerned with electronic waste this week, Bicycle Person asked for some advice on where to take his CFLs.  Thank you for the topical question, Biking Person! CFLs contain mercury, so while they can go in the regular garbage technically, they’ll leak hazardous waste if you stick them there. So when civilization and the economy implode, and we have to mine landfills for raw materials, we’ll get mercury poisoning, and then we’ll really regret not disposing of the CFLs properly.

So Alexandria has a hazardous waste disposal drop-off site every Monday.  It’s open during regular business hours, of course, so that’s fairly inconvenient for most of us. Fortunately, this tool bar at earth911.org lets you type in what you want to recycle, and your zip code, and returns local stores and government recycling programs in your area that might have more convenient hours.  Sometimes stores like Wal-Mart will have CFL collection days, too, so look out for those.

The bar is at the top of the site page. It’s green. Green! Original, that. I know I’m guilty, too. But it’s a good thing I actually really like the color green, or I’d get pretty annoyed surfing my fellow crunchy websites.

Post-Exam Thrift

Who knew that the SA on Little River was open until 9pm?  Not me.  But it’s the last time I’ll be over that way for a while, so I took the chance to look through again on my way home from my final exam.

green flower thinglotus blouseplaid dressgreen silk

As you see:  A gigantic, broken blouse, $4.  Perhaps it will become a skirt.  A top with lotuses on it, $4.  Very, very plaid dress, $5.  It has pockets!  Green silk classy thing, probably a bit too large, $7.  In case I have to do anything classy this summer.

Fare well, Little River SA, until next semester.

It’s Official

Today was officially the beginning of Spring, in the astronomical sense- the day and night are exactly equal today, so the Earth is going to start getting more sunlight than darkness and cause things to grow, finally. Except, if you’ve been outside the past couple of weeks, things are already growing- the trees were all just plotting something for a couple of weeks, and then bloop! Buds everywhere!

trees

Spring is a fantastic time of year. Well, except for the part of it where it looks lovely out, then you walk to work and it’s actually still cold and windy and starts to rain without warning; stupid spring, just admit you’re sneaky winter, hiding under a pretty face. And then it’s time for the cherry blossoms on the mall (officially, March 29th-April 13th) and the metros are all crowded for two weeks. Except for those parts, spring is awesome.

For all its tantalizing niceness, it’s not such a great thing that we’re getting the season earlier and earlier every year. Discovery News reports on how the accelerating spring is damaging to migratory species, and disruptive to the seasonal life cycles of others. And for humans, a shorter winter may mean lower heating bills this month, but it will increase allergic reactions to pollen sooner, too. Data from all the way back to the 1400s shows a significant jump in the earliness of spring starting in the 1980s- on average, the green is coming 8 hours faster each year.

On the upside, that should give us a hint to go see the cherry blossoms in the next few days- so we don’t miss the peak blooms, and we do miss the rush.

tree with bag

Ah, the green is coming back! It sure is too bad that our improperly disposed-of plastic bags got there first. Bah.


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